TITUS 2:13 – DURING MY 2ND CROSS EXAMINATION (IGLESIA NI CRISTO VS. ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH – October 28, 2017)

I gave them time to refute Granville sharp and explained this using Greek grammar that the person here refers to two persons and not just one. Yet, he was not able to answer this.
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ISINALIN MULA SA HILIGAYNON

Duane Cartujano: Sa Titus 2:13, sa greek, “tou megalou theou kai soteiros ‘eimon Yeisou christou.” Pwedi mo bang maexplain sa amin, grammatically na dalawang person yan?

Duane Cartujano: Sa Greek Ha?

(Nagtatawanan ang mga nakikinig)

Duane Cartujano: Allergy ka sa Greek e.

Rene Panoncillo: Ang mga nag-aral ng greek, isinalin nila sa english, isinalin nila sa hiligaynon.

Duane Cartujano: Okay.

Rene Panoncillo: Merong nagtranslate. Dalawa yan. Dalawa.

Duane Cartujano: Dalawa?

Rene Panoncillo: Sa Bibliya…

Duane Cartujano: Sige.

Duane Cartujano: Pwedi mong maexplain?

Moderator: 1 Minute….

Rene Panoncillo: Sasagot muna ako…

Rene Panoncillo: Sa Bibliya, hindi sa lahat ng pagkakataon GRAMMAR ang ating dapat na….
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References:

“When the copulative kai connects two nouns of the same case, if the article ho or any of its cases precedes the first of the said nouns or participles, and is not repeated before the second noun or participle, the latter always relates to the same person that is expressed or described by the first noun or participle.”(A Manual Grammar of the Greek New Testament, p. 147)

“In both readings the Greek grammar makes it very clear that Jesus Christ is God and Savior. The rule is when one articles governs two nouns joined by kai, the referent is the same person (the Granville sharp rule).” (A Commentary on the Manuscripts and text of the New Testament, Page 367)

“Since that argument carries no weight, there is no good reason to reject Titus 2:13 an explicit affirmation of the deity of Christ. “(Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics, Page 276)

“When a single article govern two singular, personal, non-proper substantives of the same case that are joined by kai, they frequently refer to the same person.”(Going Deeper with New Testament Greek, Page 177)